fbpx
The Golden Hinde Interactive Powerpoint - Early Years Resource Image

National Museums Liverpool’s Understanding Transatlantic Slavery Virtual Classroom

This virtual classroom introduces students to Liverpool’s involvement in Transatlantic Slavery.

Suitable for: KS3

Subjects: Citizenship, History

About.

Introduce your students to Liverpool’s involvement in the transatlantic slave trade.

Transatlantic slavery was responsible for the forced migration of more than 12 million people from Africa to the Americas over hundreds of years, well into the 19th century. This virtual classroom introduces students to Liverpool’s involvement in the trade, explains fundamental aspects of transatlantic slavery, and explores its impact on the lives of those involved.

In this museum-led virtual classroom, students will be guided through a series of activities to understand different facets of transatlantic slavery. The key topics covered are forced migration, enslavement on the plantation, resistance as well as abolition movements and how they connect to contemporary issues including Black Lives Matter.

Students will be introduced to historical sources and artefacts to aid and deepen their understanding of this complex and difficult history. This unique learning experience illustrates the massive impact of transatlantic slavery on the world and the ways it still impacts our lives today.

This workshop is accompanied by a pre-workshop lesson plan and post-workshop follow up activities to consolidate students’ learning on the subject matter covered.

Details.

Suitable for: KS3

Subjects: Citizenship, History

Price: £90 (per session)

Duration: 50 minutes

Min. Students: N/A

Max. Students: 32

Platform: Microsoft Teams

View this virtual school trip.

Want more FREE resources & ideas?

We’re here every step of the way to help you find the best teaching resources, activities, virtual school trip ideas & more.

Accessibility & Safety.

Safeguarding & Risk Assessment

National Museums Liverpool’s existing Safeguarding Policy remains in place and these guidelines have added detail to protect both their staff and participating schools during online engagement. Teachers are asked to read them to help provide a safe and optimal digital learning environment for students.

When running a live workshop via an online platform the National Museums Liverpool staff will:

  • Only use laptops or technology that belong to National Museums Liverpool
  • Connect using secure, private network connections, not public Wi-Fi or other lines that could be compromised
  • Provide a safe platform which only the booked group can access
  • Log in using one of the special accounts created by National Museums Liverpool for school workshops and never using a personal account
  • Have a waiting room/lobby to monitor who is joining.
  • Only run a workshop if at least one teacher from the school is present with pupils
  • Always have two museum staff present in every workshop
  • Ensure that workshops are streamed from a museum or gallery classroom or delivery space that has good lighting, using a suitable background that does not show personal items belonging to the facilitator
  • Dress professionally and act as suitable role models for young children
  • Have enhanced DBS checks
  • Ensure all their delivery teams are professionally trained and have extensive experience of delivering education programmes to the relevant key stages
  • End the meeting for all at the end of the session

 

Their staff will not:

  • Take into the workshop or use any personal mobile phones or devices
  • Record any live workshops, nor consent to being recorded by schools
  • Take or share any videos or photos of the workshops without prior agreed consent and the completion of parent consent forms
  • Engage in inappropriate conversations with children or young people or share inappropriate personal information about themselves or others
  • Discriminate favourably or unfavourably towards a child or young person
  • Undermine fundamental British values including democracy, rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect
  • Show disrespect towards students or teachers with different faiths, beliefs or from different cultures to their own
  • Ask for or use full names
  • Give personal contact details to children or young people or communicate outside of National Museums Liverpool using social media networks, email, or text

 

Managing behaviour:

  • Set clear expectations of behaviour at the start of the workshop and establish an agreed means for students to engage directly with the facilitator
  • It remains the responsibility of the teacher to manage students’ conduct throughout the workshop
  • All participants, including students, school and museum staff, will treat one another with respect, speaking with courtesy and abstaining from foul, abusive, racist or homophobic language or any inappropriate or suggestive comments
  • If a student is misbehaving the facilitator will pause delivery until the situation is settled by the teacher
  • If the group’s behaviour becomes disruptive, impeding the delivery of content, the facilitator has the right to end the workshop
SEND & Accessibility Details

N/A

This resource was created by National Museums Liverpool. Images, text and content may be subject to copyright.

We regularly check that this information is the latest and most up to date version, however it is advised that you also contact the venue directly if you need any further information, or have a particular question or concern.

About National Museums Liverpool.

National Museums Liverpool, comprising eight museums and galleries in and around Liverpool, has a range of learning resources to support schools.

Their live virtual classrooms – which explore ancient Egypt, ancient Greece, Impressionism, Liverpool’s history, RMS Titanic and Transatlantic Slavery – allow you and your students to engage with National Museums Liverpool’s collections wherever you’re based. There are also educational resources available to use on their website.

National Museums Liverpool brings learning to life for students, using real artefacts and objects to tell fascinating stories about the world around us.